1953 Aston Martin DB2/4: British charm

1953 Aston Martin DB2/4: British charm

1953 Aston Martin DB2/4: British charm

Engine Inline 6Horsepower105 BHP (77.28 KW) @ 5000 RPMTorque125 Ft-Lbs (169 NM) @ 3000 RPMEngine LocationFrontDrive TypeRWDWeight2500 lbs | 1133.981 kgTransmission4-speed  manual

The luxurious Aston Martin DB2/4 succeeded the remarkable and profitable DB2 model. It pulled the company out of the post-war crisis and marked the beginning of a prosperous era. 

Source: Car Pixel

World War II left a terrible imprint on the British auto industry. Aston Martin, as one of the British domestic automakers, was not an exception and experienced hardships in the post-war period. However, in 1947, British entrepreneur and magnate David Brown, who also owned an agricultural equipment-producing company bought the brand. This event pushed the Aston Martin brand much. The brand released several iconic models, which to this day are considered the jewels of any classic car collection.

The origins

Source: Drive-My

After David Brown bought the company in 1947, the newly launched series of automobiles dramatically changed the company’s position in the industry. The new era, more specifically, the new DB era called by his initials, began! In 1950, a remarkable event took place: DB2 was introduced becoming a real success. Its prototype was shown off in 1949 at the 24 Hours of Le Man race, immediately becoming an iconic sports roadster. However, this first automobile from David Brown remained almost unnoticed compared with the later vehicles. It was sold under the name “2 Liter Sports”, receiving the DB1 index only after DB2 was launched. Consequently, DB2 was considered the first one that opened the DB era! The DB2 prototype debuted in 1950 at an exhibition in New York, and the next three copies were sent to the Sarthe sports track at Le Man. A resounding success was inevitable: the roadster took first and second place in its class. No wonder! Aston Martin’s new automobiles were demonstrating incredible technical characteristics along with excellent quality. The brand continued its triumphant march on American circuits, coming second in the 12-hour Sebring marathon in 1950. This champion was replaced by the four-seater DB2/4, produced from 1953 to 1955 with 565 vehicles produced. Later, in 1953 DB2/4 MK1 was introduced. It was available in coupe, sedan, and convertible configurations. The sedan version with its rear window and hatchback features was a very unusual design for its time.

The 1953 model year

Source: Supercars.net

The presentation of the DB2/4 took place in London in 1953. This was a worthy successor to its predecessor, inheriting its charm and style. The number “4” indicated a four-seater configuration, and the racing two-seater was – DB3. DB2/4 was one of the most popular Aston Martins, a perfect GT class roadster every speed and style lover was chasing.   Two body styles were available in 1953: Sports Saloon (four-seater coupe) and Drophead Coupe (convertible). Remarkably, the first one became the forerunner of today’s hatchbacks, with its featured third door instead of a trunk lid. The other difference from the previous model was the headlights located above and the one-piece windshield. Otherwise, the car remained practically unchanged. It was equipped with drum brakes on all wheels and the suspension, independent of springs in front and dependent on springs at the rear. Also, the model lost the chrome trim that surrounded it earlier. Additionally,  changes were to the front bumper. Instead of a corrugated part, a smooth one was installed. Unlike its predecessor, where there was only one power unit, the new one received 2. The base Lagonda engine, inherited from the DB2 remained unchanged in the new model. It was the inline 6-cylinder unit with 12 valves, a liquid cooling system, and a 2x SU-type carburetor power system with 125 hp at 5,000 rpm. 

Did you know?

Source: Supercars.net

In 1953 American dealer Stanley Harold Arnolt ordered three DB2/4 chassis and shipped them to Bertone, Italy. There, they installed a double open body, designed by Franco Scaglione. Two cars were prepared in a lightweight racing version, and the third had improved interior trim and bumpers. The car retained all the design features of Aston Martin, but became more streamlined and low, with a wavy waistline. 

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1953 Aston Martin DB2/4: British charm

Engine Inline 6Horsepower105 BHP (77.28 KW) @ 5000 RPMTorque125 Ft-Lbs (169 NM) @ 3000 RPMEngine LocationFrontDrive TypeRWDWeight2500 lbs | 1133.981 kgTransmission4-speed  manual

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